Build Tips

Use Threadlock! Tekno Vehicles have many metal-to-metal contacts throughout, prevent screws from backing out with a light dab of thread lock on each screw that threads into metal (do not use thread lock on screws that thread into plastic)

When building you diffs, take your time to make sure they go together correctly for a smooth and long lasting diff. Check out Ryan's videos below for tips on building and making them smoother

Be careful when using a power screwdriver on screws that thread into plastic. Use a low clutch setting, and if necessary use a normal hex tool to check tightness

Use a dab of grease when building each of the CVDs, and make sure a film covers the entire 'ball' of each CVD before installing into the axle. Will drastically increase CVD life as well as improve handling.

Use a product such as Shock Snot on shock and diff O-rings to prevent swelling and oil seepage.

Steering Limiters

Yes, we know people like lots of steering. Our pro drivers tell us this all the time. Something to keep in mind though about steering...

The design of the EB/NB line of vehicles has more steering throw than any other vehicle on the market. Probably by a good 5 or more degrees. At first, we thought this was a huge advantage. Lately, through constant testing, we have found the cars are faster and waaaaay more consistent with less steering throw.

So if you're not using the built-in steering stops, you're doing yourself a huge disservice. We are using four steering limiter washers on the EB/NB/SC, and the results have been impressive. Yes, the turning radius is reduced, but lap times and consistency have proven this is a non-factor.

steering-limiter-2

Here's what goes wrong with too much steering throw:

  • Rear end washes out when landing jumps
  • Rear end continues to come around exiting corners
  • Feels like you are struggling for traction at times
  • Bump handling is unpredictable
  • Initial steering is extremely twitchy
  • And other issues to be sure

Here's what's going on. The last 5+ degrees of steering throw happen very quickly, and the servo has very very little leverage on the wheels at full throw. This causes the inside wheel to act erratically and get tossed left/right at the whims of the track surface. Without a positive stop there, the inside wheel is going crazy and causing inconsistencies with the handling. The CV's can accommodate this extreme working angle, but there is more chatter which creates further issues.

Even if you just limit your EPA, the inside wheel is still free to move too far when the conditions arise. So install the washers first, then reset your EPA to match.

There are literally dozens of other adjustments that will result in more steering if desired (shocks, springs, ride height, sway bars, diffs, camber links, toe, etc.). By first limiting the throw, you can focus on creating more 'setup steering'. Think of setup steering as being more consistent vs. mechanical steering (i.e. throw).

Additionally, you won't be fighting the car so you will be spending less time tuning something bad out and more time tuning good stuff in.

 

Differential Building

TKR6018 Emulsion Shock Build

TKR6018 - Composite Emulsion Shock Caps

Drill a small hole in the bleeder hole of the cap. Do not drill the vent hole on the side of the cap. A 2.0mm or 1/16th drill works well and be sure to remove all flashing.

Put the o-ring on the shock body.

Fill the shock to the top, so the fluid is level or even slightly higher than the body. No need to use a bladder.

By hand, carefully screw the cap on as it’s somewhat easy to cross thread the cap. Tip: Turn the cap counter clockwise until you feel the threads meet with the body, then turn the cap clockwise to seat.

Pull the shock boot over the shock end and fully push the shaft into the shock body. A little oil should come out. If none does, remove the cap and fill the body higher.

With the black o-ring on the flat head screw, screw in the screw and pump the shock about 30 times and leave the shaft fully extended.

Remove the bleeder screw and push the shaft all the way in, then quickly put the screw back in. More oil should come out. This step is important to making sure the shocks don’t hydro-lock when the shaft is fully inserted.

Using this method the shocks should be very close to dead when fully compressed and slightly retract when fully extended. Once you pump the shock a dozen times, it should be very close to dead on full compression and extension.

The last thing is to tighten the cap with tools; it needs to be snug but don't over tighten. The caps need to be a little tighter than you can do by hand but be careful when tightening the caps with tools. Usually only requires 1/16th of a turn. The composite caps need to be tight but not as tight as the aluminum caps.

It's really easy to build emulsion style, but they do need a little more maintenance as they should be rebled when traveling or if there is a large temperature differential. We also recommend rebleeding them before each event.

Most important to consistent emulsion shocks is to make sure they don't hydro lock. Meaning the shaft should be able to be fully compressed. If there is too much oil in the shock, the shaft will be tough to fully press in, and you will need to bleed them again.

Give it a try and let us know what you think!

Bladder Shock Build

Outer Diff Shims Tip

Getting the diff in the housings with one shim on each side can be challenging. They are delicate, thin, and have nothing to keep them in place while you try to install the diff. It's very easy to buckle/bend one or miss getting it in the housing.

What you can do to make installation easier is to cut a .5mm x 30-40 degree chamfer on the inside of each of the four corners of the bearing lip of each diff housing half (8 total for front diff, 8 total for rear diff). [See pic below] This allows a bit of alignment assistance to get the diff installed without damaging the shims.

chamfer-diff-shims-2
Video - Suspension Optimization

It's important that your suspension is as free as possible and able absorb bumps and jumps instead transferring energy to the chassis and making your vehicle difficult to drive.

The best way to verify that your suspension is free and operating properly is to remove the shocks and tires and make sure the arm falls under their own weight. There should be no resistance when the arm falls and it should bounce a little when it hits the droop tabs.

Also, your hinge pins should be able to be inserted into the arm easily and turn easily. Tip: We do not recommend putting any lubricant on the hinge pins as it quickly attracts dirt.

hinge-pin-reamingIf you notice that your suspension appears to be binding, our first recommendation is to ream the arms. Our SCT410,
EB48, NB48, ET48, NT48 and EB48SL vehicles use an inner hinge pin diameter of 4.0 mm. 4 mm hinge pin reamers can be found online or a good option is to use a 5/32 round chain saw file. Using an electric drill, tighten the file in the chuck and run the file through the hinge pin hole at full speed a couple times. Periodically, insert the hinge pin in the arm and see if it rotates freely. If not repeat the process

 

camber-link-plyersCheck your camber links to verify they pivot freely. From time to time, they will need to be cleaned by removing the pivot ball and wiping the inside of the rod end with a microfiber cloth. If the pivot ball does not move freely in the rod end, one trick is to pinch the rod end with plyers when the ball is inserted. Pinching the rod end directly where it holds the pivot ball enlarges the opening slightly and provides more room for the pivot ball to move.

 

Video - Setting Toe and Bump

Video - Setting Ride Height

Video - Driveline Break In

Video - Setting Camber

Video - Building Camber Links

Video - Building Brake Linkage

Video - De-burring Diff Gears

Custom Pistons and Drilling Pistons

Some of our setups use pistons with custom hole configurations. For instance 4x1.9 (Four 1.9 mm holes).

To make these pistons use our TKR6160 – Shock Piston Blanks (CNC, flat/tapered, 16 dimples, 4pcs) and drill 4ea 1.9 mm holes evenly throughout the piston.

We recommend using this piston drill set for all sizes 1.05 to 2.0 mm or this drill set for 2.0 to 3.0 mm.

Calculating Inner Hinge Pin Degrees

Our vehicles have adjustable hinge pin holders that allow users to fine-tune their suspension geometry for different tracks, conditions, or driving styles.

Using the hinge pin inserts (right), fine adjustments can be made to the location of each hinge pin. All 25 positions can be obtained by rotating the included seven inserts (indicated by color).

Base Angle

First, we start by understanding the "Base Angle" for each brace. Base Angle is obtained by using center-dot inserts insert-center-dot in each brace and the degrees are as follows:

  • Sweep = 0°
  • Kick-Up = 10°
  • Toe = 3°
  • Anti-Squat Composite "C" Brace = 3°
  • Anti-Squat Aluminum "C" Brace = 2°
hinge-pin-insert-chart

Final Angle

Next, we take the difference of both insert from center-dot and add it to the Base Angle. For instance, when calculating the Kick-Up and you have double-dot up insert-double-dot-up on "A" and double-dot down insert-double-dot-down on "B" the final angle would be 10° + 0.5° + 0.5° = 11°.

Note: From the center-dot position, only a maximum of 2° difference can be obtained by using single-dot offset inserts in opposing braces. For example insert-single-dot-up in A and insert-single-dot-down in B is 2°.

Front Arms

The attitude of the front hinge pins can be angled in or out to adjust Sweep or up and down to adjust Kick-Up.  To find the proper insert combine the horizontal setting (Sweep) and the vertical setting (Kick-Up) using the colored insert chart above.

arm-sweep Sweep - Horizontal Adjustment

The chart left shows the amount of "sweep" in degrees. Inserts in the center horizontal position on both "A" and "B" would be 0°. Maximum of 2° can be obtained by using single dot out on A and single dot in on B.

The picture (left) is top down, looking at the left side of the "A" and "B" hinge pin blocks. Positions 1 through 5 indicates moving the hinge pin left to right. 

hinge-pin-insert-chart-hotizontal

 

Kick-Up - Vertical Adjustment

The chart right shows the amount "Kick-Up" in degrees. Inserts in the center vertical position on both "A" and "B" would be 10°. Maximum of 12° can be obtained by using single dot up on A and single dot down on B.

This picture is a side profile, looking at the left side of the "A" and "B" hinge pin blocks. Positions 1 through 5 indicates moving the hinge pin up and down.

hinge-pin-insert-chart-vertical2

kickup

Rear Arms

The attitude of the rear hinge pins can be angled in or out to adjust Toe or up and down to adjust Anti-Squat. To find the proper insert combine the horizontal setting (Toe) and the vertical setting (Anti-Squat) using the colored insert chart at the top of this article.

rear-toe Toe - Horizontal Adjustment

The chart (left) shows the amount "Toe" in degrees. Inserts in the center horizontal position on both "C" and "D" would be 3°. Maximum of 5° can be obtained by using single dot in on C and single dot out on D.

This picture is top down, looking at the left side of the hinge pin blocks. Positions 1 through 5 indicates moving the hinge pin left to right. 

hinge-pin-insert-chart-hotizontal

 

Anti-Squat - Vertical Adjustment

The charts below show the amount "Anti-Squat" in degrees. Inserts in the center vertical position on both "C" and "D" would be 3° with the composite C brace and 2° with the aluminum brace. Maximum of 5° can be obtained by using single dot up on C and single dot down on D with the composite brace and 4° with the aluminum brace.

The pictures below are a side profile, looking at the left side of the "C" and "D" hinge pin blocks. Positions 1 through 5 indicates moving the hinge pin up and down.
hinge-pin-insert-chart-vertical2

antisquat-plastic antisquat-aluminum
Composite "C" Hinge Pin Brace Aluminum "C" Hinge Pin Brace